Jump to content


- - - - -

Question of the Week -- May 7, 2017


Good morning!
Welcome to the start of a new week!

Isn't it amazing that something that took you 10 minutes to stitch can take an hour or two to take out?!? Whether it's called unsewing, removing stitches, frogging or skinning a quilt, I know that we all have had to do it one time or another. So my question for you this week is...

What are some of your favorite seam rippers, tools and gadgets that help make it easier to remove those stitches?

I hope you will take a moment to share your answers with us in the forum.
  • 0


13 Comments

Purchased a Wahl Battery Trimmer to help with seam ripping. Learned about it at a retreat. Time saver!!!  Taking my Clover seam ripper, open the seam a few stitches, then holding the fabrics apart and using the Trimmer to do the rest - a snap!  

    • 0
Photo
cat-on-a-mac
May 07 2017 10:25 AM

I'm doing some paper piecing, so have teeny tiny stitches, which are a bear to get out when you mess up.  (Note, I said "when" and not "if" :He He: )  I've found that I can use my small rotary cutter (28mm) by holding it in one hand and using the other hand to separate the fabrics to expose the stitches.

 

But, I'm anxious to hear of techniques/tools for frogging something on the frame...  I usually use a normal seam ripper to cut every 4th or 5th stitch from the top, then pull the bobbin thread, but it sure can be a pain, especially if you do more than 12 or so stitches per inch.

    • 0

I'm with Laura.  For piecing, I love the tiny electric shaver for seam ripping.  For quilting, if I'm close to the edge and can easily get to it, I will use it there too. I use my Clover seam ripper a lot too.  It's comfortable to use and has a small enough tip that I can get into tightly stitched areas.

    • 0
Photo
Helen Baczynski
May 07 2017 12:14 PM

A very timely questions because I've just been doing some stitch removal.

I use these scissors for picking out stitches on a mounted quilt. The little hooks get under the stitches and are sharp. The scissors are about 4" long. The straight scissors have a sharper cutting hook than the curved ones, but I really prefer the curved ones.

Attached File  scissors.JPG   273.62KB   0 downloads

 

I snip one or two stitches then stroke the cut threads to bring up the end. I grab the end and lift it up which usually brings the bobbin thread up a little and I snip that with the scissors. Pull and snip, pull and snip. With each pull about 5 stitches come loose so I'm not snipping every stitch.

 

I once skinned a whole quilt and I used my rotary cutter for that. Pulled the layers apart with the backing on the top and stroked my cutter across the stitches. I did snip the backing more than once, but that didn't matter - it was my quilt and got a new back.

    • 0

I bought an excellent seam ripper/sewing awl combination recently from Andi Settlemoir Barney in Georgia.  Love it for regular ripping.  When paper piecing or with a quilt on the machine, I generally will use a regular seam ripper to cut through one stitch, then I use a dental tool to pick out several stitches -- maybe about two inches worth.  Then I reach under the quilt, put my finger through the loop of bobbin thread that has now been freed-up, and pull sharply.  This will dislodge many of the stitches on either side.  If you do the first part of the procedure at intervals along the line of stitching you want to take out, you can rip a lot in no time.

 

For got to say that for paper piecing, the dental tool can usually get out all of the stitches I need to remove.  No need to reach under and pull the bobbin thread in that instance.

    • 0

oh...I use whatever works well that day/ with that thread/stitch length! My trusty Clover seam ripper, tweezers..occasionally a small rotary cutter if I have a lot to do. I try to set the timer and do a bit a time. Saves my sanity and my body

    • 0
Photo
marrs_cynthia
May 07 2017 09:38 PM

Ugh. 20 minutes to stitch, 10 hours to take out. Back breaking work. My Clover ripper and scissors are my usual tools. Patience is not high on my virtue list. I dread this task.

    • 0
On my longarm, pretty much it's the basic seam ripper and tweezers. A strong pair of glasses sometimes help and always a double Diet Pepsi! If it's seams I often use a small rotary cutter.
    • 0

Clover seam ripper and tweezers if necessary.  I usually start with some chocolate, before tackling any un-sewing process.

    • 0
I have one if those new flat behind rippers. It's great but the best ripping tool I've given recently is a clamp on magnifying glass I can clamp it to the handle of the Longarm then really see the threads I, ripping
    • 0

After having to rip out a lot of stitching on the longarm, I lengthened my stitched from 10 to 12spi.  Makes it a whole lot easier to rip, and I think I like the look of a little bigger stitches anyway.  I have a pretty good seam ripper (don't know the brand) but it has a rubbery end opposite the point.  I cut every 4 or 5 stitches on the top, then pull on the bobbin thread.  Then I rub along the stitching line with the rubbery end and it picks up the little threads.  

    • 0

I use my standard seam ripper and tweezers to get the threads out.

    • 0

If it is something that I can hold in my lap, I have the pretty brass seam ripper that is shown in this video & learned to use it just like she shows...pushing the red ball, facing downward, along inside the seam.  Goes quick but the only drawback is all those little tiny pieces of thread!  I use a sticky roller for clothes to pick off those threads.

 

81EU603e6VL._SL1500_.jpg

 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=-QzJo16Zre8

 

 

For a quilt that is still on the longarm frame, I have a beautiful, hand tooled wooden handled seam ripper that my oldest brother made for me on his lathe.  He lives in Kerrville, TX & is a member of the "Texas Turners", a fabulous wood carving group.

 

Attached File  DSC_3511.JPG   116.28KB   0 downloads

 

 I LOVE it, as it is long in my hand & smooth & the little metal part he embedded in the pretty handle is very, very sharp.  I use it along with my long handled tweezers to rip out stitches on a quilt that is still on the frame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    • 0